YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

What Can Be Done

Much more help is needed for Vietnam veterans and their families…

The Time To Act Is Now

It has been 45 years since the end of the Vietnam War and 25 years since Vietnam and the United States normalized relations…

We Know What To Do

1) Clean contaminated soils and restore damaged ecosystems, 2) expand services to people with disabilities and their families.

We Need Your Help

Over the next decade, concentrated effort can ensure that this lasting ghost of the war in Vietnam is finally put to rest…

A Humanitarian Need

It is simply a humanitarian need, to restore hope and dignity to a devastated people and end the legacies of war.

What Can Be Done

It has been 45 years since the U.S war in Vietnam ended and 25 years since full diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Vietnam have been normalized. Recent progress toward a more cooperative relationship has created a window of opportunity for humanitarian and environmental intervention.

Now is the time for American to intensify its shared commitment to reduce the public health impacts of Dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange in Vietnam and to increase services to those affected and to address environmental impacts.

But much more help is needed for those affected by Agent Orange in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, as well as for Vietnam veterans and their families in the U.S. and elsewhere.  And still much more support is needed to contain and clean up Dioxin hotspots to protect the health of new generations and the environment.

 

 

> We ask the U.S. government to join the Vietnamese, Lao and Cambodian governments and others, and nongovernmental entities alike, to remediate toxic hot spots and expand services to people with disabilities or illnesses associated with exposure to Agent Orange-Dioxin.

​> We ask the U.S. government to do more for our own soldiers and their familiesto identify conditions associated with exposure and to provide timely health care and benefits.

> We ask the U.S. government to share with the government’s of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia all of the information they have on the use of herbicides during the U.S. war, including information that is still classified.

> We ask everyone, no matter where they are, to join in resolving the dark legacy of Agent Orange.

The Time To Act Is Now
We Know What To Do
1. Clean contaminated soils and restore damaged ecosystems.

The most vulnerable areas, the Dioxin hot spots, have been identified. With additional resources, the extent of contamination can be precisely determined, and a remediation plan can be developed and carried out.

> Current priority is the clean-up of the Bien Hoa Airbase: an estimated $500 million is needed.

> Other hotspots can be further examined, other local people can be educated to avoid exposure.

> Defoliated lands that have poor quality forests can be reforested, diversified or repurposed to ensure the optimum future use of such lands.

2. Expand services to people with disabilities and their families.

Services now reach less than 10 percent of those in need in Vietnam. The most needy live in rural areas. But with more financial and human resources, services for the affected people can be expanded. We are just learning the extent of the impacts in Laos and Cambodia.

> Medical and mental health professionals, teachers, and caregivers can be trained to ensure the best care possible for those in need.

> More rehabilitation centers and respite centers can be built and staffed by trained caregivers in affected areas, especially in more rural areas.

> Community-based rehabilitation programs can be expanded to reach those in need at their homes.

> Early detection and early intervention programs can be developed to give children services shortly after birth or when disability first emerges.

3. Research the health and epigenetic impacts of Agent Orange-Dioxin.

Recent work on epigenetic studies in animals has shown that dioxin has generational impacts on health as well as induce congenital malformations. More needs to be understood on how humans may be impacted.

> Funding needs to be allocated to help conduct and advance further studies.

> Epidemiological studies of Children of U.S. Vietnam Veterans and their children need to be conducted.

> Epidemiological studies in Vietnam and other exposed populations should also be conducted.

Over the next decade, concentrated effort will require a partnership among government and non-governmental groups, private citizens and public institutions, professionals and volunteers, corporations and non-profits, U.S. Veterans and Vietnamese, and most of all, with you. 

We Need Your Help
A Humanitarian Need

This is not a question of who is responsible, legally or morally.

It is simply a humanitarian need, to restore hope and dignity to a devastated people and end the legacies of war. 

But it’s not just the U.S. Government that has a role to play in repairing the damages caused by Agent Orange and other toxic herbicides. We all must play a part in ending this toxic legacy.